Archive for September, 2016

                    There are many special places and experiences unique to Memphis, but at the top of our list is the National Civil Rights Museum. I was present at the creation, developing the plan for city and county political support and funding and negotiating the contract with […]

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by (RSS) Poverty | September 27th, 2016 12:52am CDT | 6 Comments

                      U.S. Census data showed decreases in the poverty rate for Memphis from 29.8% in 2013 to 26.2% in 2015, a decline of 12%. Meanwhile, the child poverty rate dropped from 46.9% to 43% for an 8% decline.  Among African Americans, the poverty rate fell […]

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by (RSS) Poverty | September 22nd, 2016 12:41am CDT | No Comments

                  The conclusion of the Blueprint for Poverty summary says: “It is possible to significantly reduce poverty in Memphis.  Much can be accomplished by incremental improvements in existing efforts and systems.  More can be accomplished by realistic, “out of the box,” changes in systems and approaches using […]

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by (RSS) Poverty | September 21st, 2016 12:15am CDT | No Comments

                With all the talk and proposals about growing the economy in the presidential campaign, they face the reality that the U.S. is in an era of slow growth, and what’s yet to be acknowledged – in the campaigns and in the local economic development agenda – is […]

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by (RSS) Civil Rights, Downtown Revitalization | September 19th, 2016 12:20am CDT | 1 Comment

                        It was 1986 and the betting on a proposed civil rights museum in Memphis was that it would never be built. It was caught in the snare of racial politics in Memphis, and if it were not for Ned McWherter, the son of […]

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by (RSS) Economic Development, Poverty | September 15th, 2016 12:19am CDT | No Comments

              This is the mantra: there is no economic prosperity in Memphis without poverty reduction. That was the closing sentence in our last post, which was the first part of this two-part commentary. Poverty reduction, including income disparities, is also the Memphis region’s biggest economic opportunity.  If the racial […]

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by (RSS) Poverty, Transportation, Uncategorized | September 14th, 2016 10:40am CDT | No Comments

Thanks to Bennett Foster for sending: The  Memphis Bus Riders Union and Amalgamated Transit  Union Local 713 are  launching a new campaign with a petition to restore the​ ​31  Crosstown​, a  historic bus route eliminated by Memphis Area Transit Authority in  2013.  The two groups represent hundreds of  MATA drivers and riders who say  that […]

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by (RSS) Economic Development, Neighborhoods, Poverty | September 12th, 2016 12:53am CDT | 8 Comments

                    In recent years, we seem to have had a record number of really smart people making speeches and presentations and speaking to clusters of involved, dedicated Memphians concerned about the future of Memphis. We’ve heard lessons from other cities, we’ve heard about livability, we’ve heard […]

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                            The following article was written by a favorite Memphis economist of ours, David Ciscel, former Chair of the Economics Department, Associate Dean of Fogelman School of Business, Dean of the Graduate School, and Senior Consultant for the Federal Reserve Bank of […]

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by (RSS) Economic Development | September 7th, 2016 12:24am CDT | No Comments

The following is a post from September 20, 2006, about how to measure success in Memphis.  This is the latest in our regular feature flashing back to blog posts from 10 years ago.  Who knew we’d still be looking for an broad agenda for the music industry? Whether the president of the Memphis and Shelby […]

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by (RSS) Trends and Issues | September 2nd, 2016 12:56am CDT | 5 Comments

                  It’s hard to imagine that other cities get as worked up as Memphis does when it ends up on one of the endless stream of cities’ lists that include words like “worst” or “most miserable.” Then again, maybe that’s a sign of progress. It wasn’t too […]

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